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91% of Gen Z report physical or psychological problems due to stress, so we are trying to do our best to help you de-stress. Stress has time and time again been scientifically proven to effect your gut (Murray, 2004), and therefore your skin. Hopefully we aren't sounding like a broken record yet, but yes, we are focusing on the gut-skin axis once again! 

 

GUT-SKIN AXIS

So first of all, what is an "axis"? Specifically, the gut-skin axis. The gut-skin axis refers to the bidirectional relationship between the gut microbiome and skin health (2001). Meaning whatever is happening around your skin, can be a sign of what's happening in your gut, vice versa. 

The gut microbiome’s balance and effect on the skin were initially introduced in 2016 by Arcket al (Renata Block, 2023). The microbiome (aka the environment) within the skin and the gut keeps you healthy, and it keeps your immune system in check. When your gut isn't healthy, it directly effects our skin. Recent research have shown a solid relationship between the gut--skin axis and the gut microbiome balance being vital to maintaining health and optimal immunity (Renata Block, 2023)

 

SIGNS OF GUT BARRIER DAMAGE (ACCORDING TO YOUR SKIN)

As we've mentioned, whatever is happening in your gut directly affects whatever may be happening on your skin (ahem, the gut-skin axis). So if your gut barrier is damaged, here are some signs your skin may be giving you: 

  • Eczema
  • Psoriasis
  • Vitiligo
  • Acne
  • Atopic dermatitis
  • Urticaria

 

TIPS TO RESTORE YOUR GUT (AND THEREFORE YOUR SKIN)

To restore your gut, studies have been really leaning into prebiotics and probiotics to help keep a healthy gut microbiome. Breaking down the benefits of each will help you understand why taking both is much more beneficial than one or the other. You can find prebiotics and probiotics in supplements, or the foods you may already have in your kitchen! 

Prebiotics: A non-living “fertilizer” that helps feed and increase the growth of beneficial bacteria such as Bifidobacteria and Lactobacilli (Renata Block, 2023). If you aren't a fan of taking supplements, prebiotics are found in different foods, including asparagus, sugar beet, garlic, chicory, onion, Jerusalem artichoke, wheat, honey, banana, barley, tomato, rye, soybean, human's and cow's milk, peas, beans, etc., and recently, seaweeds and microalgae (Davani-Davari, 2019)

Probiotic: Live bacteria and/or yeast. The primary purpose is to "replace" the good bacteria in the gut that a variety of factors, such as oral antibiotics, stress, and inflammation, can deplete. So if you're not taking probiotic supplements, you can add yogurt, kefir, sauerkraut, kombucha, pickles, sourdough bread, and miso into your diet to promote your gut health! The most commonly found probiotics are Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium, but specific strains for treating certain conditions, such as acne, include a type of Lactobacillus known as Rhamnosus SP1 (Renata Block, 2023).

Aaaaand, if you want to learn more about prebiotics and probiotics, we did a SIMPLE breakdown here. Check it out ☻

 

Simply put, your gut is the second brain of your body, and your skin is the largest organ in your body! In order to improve your skin barrier, you must first improve your gut barrier! Remember, your body is always talking to each other! 

 

DISCLAIMER: THIS POST DOES NOT CONSTITUTE AS MEDICAL ADVICE. THIS POST IS NOT MEANT TO TREAT, CURE, PREVENT, OR DIAGNOSE CONDITIONS OR DISEASES; AND IS MEANT FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES. AS ALWAYS, PLEASE CONSULT YOUR DOCTOR BEFORE TRYING ANY NEW TREATMENTS OR SUPPLEMENTS.

 

Renata Block, M. (2023, April 11). Gut Health and its impact on the skin. Dermatology Times. https://www.dermatologytimes.com/view/gut-health-and-its-impact-on-the-skin

Davani-Davari D, Negahdaripour M, Karimzadeh I, Seifan M, Mohkam M, Masoumi SJ, Berenjian A, Ghasemi Y. Prebiotics: definition, types, sources, mechanisms, and clinical applications. Foods. 2019 Mar 9;8(3):92. doi: 10.3390/foods8030092.

Murray, C. D. R., Flynn, J., Ratcliffe, L., Jacyna, M. R., Kamm, M. A., & Emmanuel, A. V. (2004). Effect of acute physical and psychological stress on gut autonomic innervation in irritable bowel syndrome. In Gastroenterology (Vol. 127, Issue 6, pp. 1695–1703). Elsevier BV. https://doi.org/10.1053/j.gastro.2004.08.057

De Pessemier, B., Grine, L., Debaere, M., Maes, A., Paetzold, B., & Callewaert, C. (2021). Gut-Skin Axis: Current Knowledge of the Interrelationship between Microbial Dysbiosis and Skin Conditions. Microorganisms9(2), 353. https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms9020353

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